Live Coding Drones #3

October 15, 2013 in Electronic, Music, Video, Visual

More tweaks to my live coding setup in vim. Trying out the motus color scheme. Using delimitMate for automatic enclosures, SuperTab for autocomplete, snipmate for snippet expansion. Also decided to try using keyCastr to display all my keystrokes.

Started out with a basic master effects synth and bussing setup. I have a routine spawning a one synth that I constantly tweak. Later I add in a simple band passed noise synth for a little variation while I keep messing with the other one. Pitches are all derived from the overtones of two ratios which I alter from time to time.

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Live Coding Drones #2

October 11, 2013 in Electronic, Music, Video, Visual

Practicing jumping around Vim to quickly edit parts of existing code. All code was pre-written with the intent that certain parts would be edited as things progressed.

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Live Coding Drones #1

October 9, 2013 in Electronic, Music

This is the first of possibly a series of recordings of my live coded drone music practice. For this session, I decided:

-start with one background synth that I coded beforehand and code the rest on the fly
-the primary synth would be made primarily from a SinOsc
-do a generic arch form

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Duality

August 30, 2013 in Electronic, Music, Video, Visual

An exploration of parallel gradual processes in audio and video, focusing on density and black/white balance (notan).
Video created with Processing. Music created with SuperCollider.

Duality from Cole Ingraham on Vimeo.

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SuperCollider Difference Tone Finder

June 25, 2013 in Music, Tutorials

Something that I need quite often is to find the difference tone between various pitches. For those unfamiliar with difference tones, it is a physical acoustic phenomenon where when any two frequencies are played simultaneously, you hear the difference between them (the higher minus the lower). If you’ve been around a pair of high instruments playing together you may have noticed a third, lower tone sounding below them. Or if you’ve heard power chords on a distorted electric guitar you actually hear a note an octave below the lowest note.

I’ve been working a lot with harmonies based on a set of just intonation ratios and amplifying their difference tone. When only dealing with two pitches at a time, it’s easy enough to just subtract them but once you have three or more, you must subtract every pair and find the lowest to know what the “primary” difference tone is. I’ve done this by hand before and it can be quite time consuming so I finally got around to making a little tool in SuperCollider to do it for me. It’s really simple: it loops through an array of ratios or frequencies, adds the difference of every pair to a list, sorts that list, and returns the lowest (first in the sorted list) difference tone. Here’s an exammple:

JustIntonationTools.differenceToneRatio([1,6/5,8/5,9/5]).asRational;

will return 8/5, which is the lowest ratio of all the difference tones in that set. Maybe someone out there will find a use for this in their work but it’s something I need constantly. The JustIntonationTools class currently only has this one method but I’m sure I’ll be adding more over time. It can be found on my github if you’d like to play with it. I should point out that it requires the TuningLib quark created by Charles Hutchins as he has a great method to adjust ratios to be within an octave.

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